Grossmont College Kids Are Kids Until They Commit Crime Questions

Juvenile Justice Unit

Quote Integration and MLA Format

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The Modern Language Association (MLA) has rules and guidelines for both in-text citations and work cited pages. When you write a paper that uses outside sources, you will be expected to follow these guidelines. You will also be expected to introduce quotes correctly and paraphrase properly. The exercises below are meant to help you practice quote integration, MLA format, and paraphrasing.

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Directions: The passage below is from “Antisocial Networking” by Hilary Stout. In the exercises that follow, you will use it to practice quote integration, paraphrasing, and MLA format.

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(1) Children used to actually talk to their friends. Those hours spent on the family princess phone or hanging out with pals in the neighborhood after school vanished long ago. But now, even chatting on cell phones or via e-mail (through which you can at least converse in paragraphs) is passé. For today’s teenagers and preteens, the give and take of friendship seems to be conducted increasingly in the abbreviated snatches of cell phone texts and instant messages, or through the very public forum of Facebook walls and MySpace bulletins. (Andy Wilson, the 11-year-old boy involved in the banter above, has 418 Facebook friends.)

(2) Last week, the Pew Research Center found that half of American teenagers — defined in the study as ages 12 through 17 — send 50 or more text messages a day and that one third send more than 100 a day. Two thirds of the texters surveyed by the center’s Internet and American Life Project said they were more likely to use their cell phones to text friends than to call them. Fifty-four percent said they text their friends once a day, but only 33 percent said they talk to their friends face-to-face on a daily basis. The findings came just a few months after the Kaiser Family Foundation reported that Americans between the ages of 8 and 18 spend on average 7 1/2 hours a day using some sort of electronic device, from smartphones to MP3 players to computers — a number that startled many adults, even those who keep their BlackBerrys within arm’s reach during most waking hours.

In the exercises that follow, I will use language from the first paragraph of the above passage, and you will use language from the second paragraph.

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  1. Perhaps the easiest way to introduce a quote is to simply share the title of the work, the name of the speaker, and a basic verb.

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Example: In “Antisocial Networking,” author Hilary Stout explains that “the give and take of friendship seems to be conducted increasingly in the abbreviated snatches of cell phone texts and instant messages” (Stout).

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Choose a quote from the second paragraph, and integrate it in the same fashion.

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  1. Another way to introduce a quote is to use a colon. When you do so, your lead-in must be a stand alone independent clause:

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Example: In “Antisocial Networking,” author Hilary Stout explains how social relationships have changed in recent years: “the give and take of friendship seems to be conducted increasingly in the abbreviated snatches of cell phone texts and instant messages” (Stout).

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Choose a quote from the second paragraph (feel free to use the same one), and integrate it in the same fashion.

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  1. One more way to introduce a quote is to do it seamlessly. When you do this, you just use the author’s language to finish your own thought, but you use quotation marks to indicate which words are the author’s.

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Example: Many of my friends only seem to only communicate “in the abbreviated snatches of cell phone texts and instant messages” (Stout).

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Choose a quote from the second paragraph (feel free to use the same one), and integrate it in the same fashion.

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  1. An alternative to quoting an author is to paraphrase. Paraphrasing means to state the same thing as the author but use different words. When you paraphrase, you must still cite your source.

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Example: As Hilary Stout notes in “Antisocial Networking,” many kids today do not even like to talk on their cell phones anymore; they prefer to send text messages or post on friends’ pages (Stout).

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Choose a sentence from the second paragraph (feel free to use the same one), and paraphrase it.

Formal research papers should end in an MLA format work cited page. Click here for an example of a work cited page. There are very specific rules for how you are supposed to list sources and format the page.

  • Notice the citations are in alphabetical order by author’s last name (if no author alphabetize by the title of the article)
  • Notice the hanging indentation which means the top line is aligned on the left and the others are indented below it
  • Make sure to call it Work Cited and have it centered at the top

You can also paste the information into easybib.com and it will make the citation for you.

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Directions: Below, you will find a list of each of the sources we studied in this unit along with the information you will need in order to produce a proper entry on a work cited page. You will also find a generic example of the format you must use for each. Utilizing all of this information, produce a correct citation for each work.

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Source #1: Pro Treating as Juveniles

  • Name of Author: Marjie Lundstrom
  • Title: “Kids Are Kids Until They Commit Crimes?”
  • Title of Publication: Sacramento Bee
  • Date Published: 01 march 2001
  • Pages: 45-46

Format:

Last name, first name. “Title of Article.” Title of Publication, date of publication

Create your citation in the box below

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Source #2: Pro Treat as Juveniles

  • Name of Author: Paul Thompson
  • Title: “Startling Finds on Teenage Brains”
  • Title of Publication: Sacramento Bee
  • Date Published: 25 May 2001
  • Pages: 47-48

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Format:

Last name, first name. “Title of Article.” Title of Publication, date of publication

Create your citation in the box below

Source #3: Treat Them as Adults

  • Name of Author: Jennifer Jenkins
  • Title of Article: “On Punishment and Teen Killers”
  • Title of publication: Information Exchange
  • Date Published: 02 August 2011
  • Pages 49-50

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Format:

Last name, first name. “Title of Article.” Title of Publication, date of publication

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Create your citation in the box below. Click here for help.

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Source #4: Pro Juvenile

  • Name of author: Gail Garinger
  • Title of article: “Juveniles Don’t Deserve Life Sentences”
  • Title of publication: New York Times
  • Date published: 14 March 2012
  • Pages: 51-52

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Format:

Last name, first name. “Title of Article.” Title of Publication, date of publication

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Create your citation in the box below

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Source #5: Brain Article: Pro Juvenile

  • Name of author: No author
  • Title of article: “Adolescence, Brain Development and Legal Culpability”
  • Title of publication: Juvenile Justice Center
  • Date published: January 2004
  • Pages: 1-4

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Format:

“Title of Article.” Title of Publication, date of publication

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Create your citation in the box below

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